fbpx

small head 4

Home>>Russian icons

Russian Icon - Three Saints: St. John the Baptist, St. Martyr Paraskevi of Rome (Friday) & St. Nicholas the Wonderworker of Myra

Saint Nicholas of Myra (270 - 343), was a historic 4th-century Saint and Greek Bishop of Myra. Because of the many miracles attributed to his intercession, he is also known as Nikolas the Wonderworker. He had a reputation for secret gift-giving, such as putting coins in the shoes of those who left them out for him, and thus became the model for Santa Claus. His reputation evolved among the faithful, as was common for early Christian saints. 

Saint John the Baptist was a Jewish itinerant preacher in the early first century AD who is revered as a significant religious figure in Christianity, Islam, and other faiths. He is called a prophet by all of these traditions and is honored as a saint in many Christian traditions. The Orthodox faithful believe that John was the last of the Old Testament prophets, thus serving as a bridge between that period of revelation and the New Covenant. They also teach that, following his death, John descended into Hades and there once more preached that Jesus the Messiah was coming, so he was the Forerunner of Christ in death as he had been in life. Eastern Orthodox churches will often have an icon of St. John the Baptist in a place of honor on the iconostasis, frequently mentioned during the Divine Services. Every Tuesday throughout the year is dedicated to his memory.

Saint Paraskevi of Iconium (also known as Paraskeva Pyatnitsa) is venerated as a Christian virgin martyr. Her parents were Christian, and Paraskevi was named as such (the name means “Friday” in Greek) because she was baptized on a Friday and because Friday was the day of Christ's Passion. She became a preacher, and according to tradition, converted Emperor Antoninus Pius to Christianity but was subsequently martyred at Iconium during the persecutions of Diocletian. Saint Paraskevi-Pyatnitsa developed a personality and functions of her own on Russian soil. She is traditionally depicted as an ascetic figure wearing the red of martyrdom. She holds an Eastern cross in one hand and a scroll professing her faith in another. In Russia, Paraskeva-Pyatnitsa is the patroness of traders and fairs, and of the Holy Matrimony.

Additional Info

  • ID#: 300-050-014-SP1
  • Size: 7 1/2 x 6 3/4 inches (19 x 17 cm)
  • Age: ca. 1860s
  • Origin: Central Russia
  • Materials: Egg tempera on gessoed wood
  • Price: $475
  • Orthodox Cross
0
0
0
s2sdefault

SAVE 5% from your first purchase when you subscribe to receive our infrequent mailings with updates on new arrivals, exclusive offers, and fascinating stories on relevant subjects. 

Please wait